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mayor of the great city of san francisco mayor ed lee. >> audience: let's go giants! let's go giants. >> let's go giants. wow how thrilled we're are to have the world series champions back in san francisco. what a year it has been. it's been the year of the orange dragon. yeah! . orange october. but you know we have celebrated, we have screamed, we have shouted all year long and once again the giants have captured our imagination and team work and they did the hard work. often we look at sports and we have super stars and we have super stars but there is a motto on the clubhouse wall and it says "25 guys, one common goal, win today". [cheers and applause] and they certainly live up to this motto. when i see young people, all of the city supporting giants gear it's about the impact of this team. it is hard work, perseverance and hard work and work with each other. did bruce bochy and these 25 guys quick when they lost the first two games against cincinnati? no. did they accept the inevitable with st. louis? no. they carried on with determination and experts and pundits pr
city of san francisco mayor ed lee. >> audience: let's go giants! let's go giants. >> let's go giants. wow how thrilled we're are to have the world series champions back in san francisco. what a year it has been. it's been the year of the orange dragon. yeah! . orange october. but you know we have celebrated, we have screamed, we have shouted all year long and once again the giants have captured our imagination and team work and they did the hard work. often we look at sports and we have super stars and we have super stars but there is a motto on the clubhouse wall and it says "25 guys, one common goal, win today". [cheers and applause] and they certainly live up to this motto. when i see young people, all of the city supporting giants gear it's about the impact of this team. it is hard work, perseverance and hard work and work with each other. did bruce bochy and these 25 guys quick when they lost the first two games against cincinnati? no. did they accept the inevitable with st. louis? no. they carried on with determination and experts and pundits predicted that this sa
to make a very special presentation please welcome the great mayor of the great city of san francisco mayor ed lee. >> audience: let's go giants! let's go giants. >> let's go giants. wow how thrilled we're are to have the world series champions back in san francisco. what a year it has been. it's been the year of the orange dragon. yeah! . orange october. but you know we have celebrated, we have screamed, we have shouted all year long and once again the giants have captured our imagination and team work and they did the hard work. often we look at sports and we have super stars and we have super stars but there is a motto on the clubhouse wall and it says "25 guys, one common goal, win today". [cheers and applause] and they certainly live up to this motto. when i see young people, all of the city supporting giants gear it's about the impact of this team. it is hard work, perseverance and hard work and work with each other. did bruce bochy and these 25 guys quick when they lost the first two games against cincinnati? no. did they accept the inevitable with st. louis? no.
. >> if you see that? >> behind the city, behind the houses, behind those hills. the see any more hills? >> these kids are wonderful. they get to explore, they get to see different things. >> we let them explore a little bit. they get their best. if their parents ever ask, we can learn -- they can say that they learned about the depth of field or the rule of thirds or that the shadows can give a good contrast. some of the things they come up with are fantastic. that is what we're trying to encourage. these kids can bring up the creativity and also the love for photography. >> a lot of people come into my classes and they don't feel like they really are creative and through the process of working and showing them and giving them some tips and ideas. >> this is kind of the best kept secret. you should come on and take a class. we have orientations on most saturdays. this is a really wonderful location and is the real jewel to the community. >> ready to develop your photography skills? the harvey milk photo center focuses on adult classes. and saturday workshops expose youth and adults to
of circumstances, if the sheriff is too harsh, he will open up the city for liability and criticism because some people may say he's overcompensating for his dee advertising is. -- deficiency. if he is perceived to be too lenient, he will be criticized because he's being too lenient. if he releases someone at the wrong time and there is additional violence, there will be additional liability to the city because it will be perceived as being a release that took place because of his own personal problems. it doesn't matter how you slice it, and that's why i sent him a letter and asked him to voluntarily recuse himself while he's on probation. that was a very, very narrowly crafted letter. it was very reasonable. and he has refused to do so. he sent me a response basically saying, i have consulted with my attorney. i have talked to my staff. i do not see a conflict. but if there is a conflict, i'll take care of it. trust me, my response to that is that i'm asking the city attorney now to draw a local ordinance that would prohibit the sheriff from supervising [speaker not understood] during the time
in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're fini
cost savings come from department to department for the city for any of the consolidations. isn't there is a need -- didn't i just do this? we propose a consolidated city wide ict budget and staffing plans. we propose a survey of ict performance from departments that is updated periodically. we propose console daitd ict management asset system for these purposes. we propose a data base for personnel. maybe we have enough data but we're not collecting the right useful data. everyone agrees that hiring for technology needs to be improved. technology is a highly dynamic and ever changing field. no one can predict the five years of technology or what talent will be required. of your cell phone. the administrator requires a staffing plan. doesn't exist. there maybe hurdles to overcome but hiring as permanent exempt is better than the traditional civil service for technology. it reduces time to hire. it raises proakt of attracting top talent. it means hiring mistakes can be corrected easily. it's done elsewhere in the city. lawyers and our attorney departments do have at
across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets th
. hurwitz: city tunnel number 3 will be an opportunity to take city tunnel 1 out of operation and rehabilitate it. city tunnel number 1 had one valve to shut off the whole tunnel. city tunnel 2 had two parallel valves. city tunnel 3 has 32, so there's much more redundancy. lloyd: we're targeting a completion date of 2012 for tunnel 3. and we already are starting to prepare to take tunnel 1 offline. narrator: the construction of tunnel 3 is vital for maintaining the sustainability of new york's drinking water infrastructure. but the pipeline is useless if there's not a reliable supply of clean water within it. hurwitz: the city bought up land around the reservoirs to prevent it from development. it provides assistance to local residents to see that there's no pollution of the reservoirs. it's much more cost effective to prevent pollution and to protect a source of water than to remove it at the drinking water treatment plant. lloyd: what epa said to us was, "you can have an exemption from filtration "if you keep this undeveloped, "and if you can manage the wastewater so that it
was written on the way holley near and joan baez were coming here to 34 years ago to the steps of city hall. and she wrote this as an anthem, coming 34 years ago to the steps of city hall. so, holley nears, we are angry people. ♪ we are gentle angry people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are here together and we are singing, singing for our lives we are gay and straight together and we are singing, singing for our lives we are [speaker not understood] speaking people and we are singing, singing for our lives we are [speaker not understood] speaking people and and we are singing singing for our lives we are a land of many colors and we are singing singing for our lives we are a land of many colors and we are singing singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing singing for our lives we are gentle angry people and we are singing singing for our lives ♪ [cheering and applauding] >> good morning everyone. >> morning. >> good morning. >> good morning on this do you feel sunny day that we d
. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of
) >> hey, pete. and introduce our volunteers and vips, san francisco city ask county, the honorable mayor ed lee. [cheering and applauding] * >> from the san francisco police department, the chief of course, greg. and the san francisco police department command staff. [cheering and applauding] >> the san francisco fire department. with chief joanne hayes white, san francisco fire department command staff. [cheering and applauding] >> we're not there yet. a little anxious. [laughter] >> where was i here? united states army, deputy commanding officers of the pacific division, colonel petty stratford, senior officer staff. [cheering and applauding] >> san francisco heights president hu man services commission, commissioner scott kahn. (applause) >> okay, here we come now. san francisco fire department lieutenant bob arazave. (applause) >> san francisco fire department station 2 headed by lieutenant jay johnson. [cheering and applauding] >> and the firefighters from san francisco fire department station 2, let's hear it for them. (applause) >> now, did i miss anybody? >>> college fire -- >> t
and the city set forth aggressive greenhouse gas reduction targets. san francisco emissions come from a variety of sources, but electricity is about 25% of that, so it's one of the largest areas for reduction in the city. san francisco's electricity supply is actually quite clean to the national average. we are 41% renewable if you include hydro electric power and hetch hetchy and pg&e hydro generation, but the goal as set out by mayor newsom is to become 100% renewable and we have a task force comprised of leaders and community and stakeholders, environmental ngo's and the local utilities and relevant city departments. the task force met for 18 months monthly to discuss issues with renewable energy development for the city and the was to do this goal within 10 years so we looked at barriers and technical opportunities, financial aspects and of course public education and awareness, and ultimately outlined recommendations around three areas, energy efficiency and utility generation and the course identified five prong strategy to help achieve this goal and the first is shrink the pa
. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quita while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and mh more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild o
brook representing san francisco green party and the local organization our city. first a technical point on all of this. i was under the impression and check with dhr on this that the executive position still exists but filled on an interim basis. maybe i am wrong on that but good to make sure you're correct on that from the staff's perspective. i agree bringing it back in house because the next year is going to be really big for clean power sf and some other things and we need somebody that can be available five days a week, 50 weeks a year. i mean that's really going to be important, but the main thing i want to focus on is that the advocates for clean power sf have had some concerns with the way that lafco -- when we originally set set up lafco to work on clean power sf and especially get at the beginning of 2007 and what we needed from lafco and i believe the intention we needed somebody on task for clean power sf itself that could approach the sf puc on many occasions the sf puc wasn't thinking outside of the box on this to put it politely, and we need someone, and i think
. and introduce our volunteers and vips, san francisco city ask county, the honorable mayor ed lee. [cheering and applauding] * >> from the san francisco police department, the chief of course, greg. and the san francisco police department command staff. [cheering and applauding] >> the san francisco fire department. with chief joanne hayes white, san francisco fire department command staff. [cheering and applauding] >> we're not there yet. a little anxious. [laughter] >> where was i here? united states army, deputy commanding officers of the pacific division, colonel petty stratford, senior officer staff. [cheering and applauding] >> san francisco heights president hu man services commission, commissioner scott kahn. (applause) >> okay, here we come now. san francisco fire department lieutenant bob arazave. (applause) >> san francisco fire department station 2 headed by lieutenant jay johnson. [cheering and applauding] >> and the firefighters from san francisco fire department station 2, let's hear it for them. (applause) >> now, did i miss anybody? >>> college fire -- >> the city college fi
pursuant to the street plaque ordinance as a gift to the city and waiving permanent mermt and inspection fees to the plaque ininstallation. >> this item passes item ten. >> item ten is a system ordinance with north star solar requiring north star solar to pay the utilities commission to mitigate the impacts caused by the interconnection caused by north star solar project. >> this ordinance is passed item 11? >>> item 11 is amending the business and police tax codes regulating license regulation, parking it's a funds and administrative citation process. >> supervisor campos. >> colleagues i introduced this legislation after hearing from small parkings who were having a hard time meeting the requirements that the city has in place and we have also heard of third party tax collection and the legislation before you amend it's the city's parking enforce law under city and tax code by reducing the bonding requirement for operator that is have a strong tax compliance and simplifying bond categorized and clarifying assurities under the law and how administrative citations are handled
annenberg media ♪ captioningponsored narrator:north amers called "anglo-america" due ttwo cities--nce o butmontreal and vancouver--ada, are distcte for eir n-english societies. inancouver, on canada's pacic coas asian imgration stirs a cultural conflict are distcte for eir n-english societies. that highligs the relaonship between globalonctionstirs a cuand cal ices.ct are distcte for eir n-english societies. andavid ho is one4, of theop reaestate agents in vancouverbritish combia andavid ho is one4, of theop reaestate agents caus kwsthiclare ok in vancouverbritish combia david's family contracting business designed and built this house specifically for asian buyers, like the hong kong chinese family who will be viewing it today. inside this $1.3illion home are many luxury atures which, davidays,redemanded. e feature of ts ng roomisrsof e it's a very rge ving room. which, davidays,redemanded. e feature of ts ng roomisrsof e then it's the high ceiling. um... you know, it makes the room very spacious. narrator: space is extremely limited in the crowded city ohong kong, but in canada
something as well. you know, there are many streets of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san francisco. these are names we should never forget. we'll see another names as they serve our great city and become our great local heroes. many of these names now on this very wonderful interactive board. tonight celebrate. celebrate the whole month and make sure we remember our heroes and
because it's not just a matter can be solved with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play miami excited who will win that game. of the tens of thousands that watch those games those role models on the field are not ministers. those athletes have a role to play in diffusing this crisis in our culture. those that do music and art and attract by the thousands. we pay to hear them sing and watch them perform. they must lift their art above deck dance and inspire and something blowing in the wind and can't recycle our worse fears. our nation has become much too violent. we're the most violent nation on earth. we make of the most guns and we shoot them. we make the most bombs and we drop them. in this state unions larger than the teacher union and building first class jails and second class schools and [inaudible] stop the problem. each out and convene the family is the first step in the
, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet.
and the local organization our city. first a technical point on all of this. i was under the impression and check with dhr on this that the executive position still exists but filled on an interim basis. maybe i am wrong on that but good to make sure you're correct on that from the staff's perspective. i agree bringing it back in house because the next year is going to be really big for clean power sf and some other things and we need somebody that can be available five days a week, 50 weeks a year. i mean that's really going to be important, but the main thing i want to focus on is that the advocates for clean power sf have had some concerns with the way that lafco -- when we originally set set up lafco to work on clean power sf and especially get at the beginning of 2007 and what we needed from lafco and i believe the intention we needed somebody on task for clean power sf itself that could approach the sf puc on many occasions the sf puc wasn't thinking outside of the box on this to put it politely, and we need someone, and i think we will need someone well versed in local distribu
this city with this free thinking attitude is capable of providing leadership to the whole world, but there needs to be all sides involved and this city does that and i thank you supervisor olague for your leadership. >> thank you. next speaker please. >> i would like to thank supervisor olague for her leadership as well and call on the hearing on education and as well as housing. those are two issues that affect african-american community across the country as well as san francisco. i'm -- you know what i do for a living. i'm a homeless advocate. i advocate for homeless people and clifford hoosier has been coming to my center for two years now and a immigrant from sierra leon. if he returns to his home he will be killed. he is requesting asylum here in san francisco. he hasn't gotten s he is not here illegal. he's a harvard graduate as well. next year january 31 and i just been coming to city hall to try to get support for him as well, and that's pretty much all i have to sai. i would like him to speak for himself. >> i want to thank the commission for its work. this i
is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 milln gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations center and our emergency operations center for things like earth quack. that building had to be immediately occupiable. great. but we can do better than that. so, this new technology that we ended up using was a concrete building that straps basically, that goes through the interior of the building and allow the building to turn or twist as part of an earthquake as it corrects itself. >> in the course for the puc building
to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man ama
of small business to comply with 14 city departments pop operation i stated within four most the office would issue a report that analyzed the existing laws and regular blagses that basket all small business and is make recommend dayses and consolidation. you committed that this report will be completed by june of this year and as of today no nothing has been done to consolid date this and mr. mayor, i look forward to continuing to work with your administration on a wide variety of efforts to assist or small businesses can you recommit to carrying out this mandate of prop i and when will this be forth coming. >>> thank you for your question and the opportunity to provide and you the full board with an up date and i know how serious you are about ensuring the small business and is stream lining the action with the city. because businesses don't care whether it's a d ph, t rx or h s b, we are all one big hurdle to come and as part of my plan i made technology to cut through base businesses a top priority for me the work is well under way supervisor and it's important that it get done i
as a gift to the city and waiving permanent mermt and inspection fees to the plaque ininstallation. >> this item passes item ten. >> item ten is a system ordinance with north star solar requiring north star solar to pay the utilities commission to mitigate the impacts caused by the interconnection caused by north star solar project. >> this ordinance is passed item 11? >>> item 11 is amending the business and police tax codes regulating license regulation, parking it's a funds and administrative citation process. >> supervisor campos. >> colleagues i introduced this legislation after hearing from small parkings who were having a hard time meeting the requirements that the city has in place and we have also heard of third party tax collection and the legislation before you amend it's the city's parking enforce law under city and tax code by reducing the bonding requirement for operator that is have a strong tax compliance and simplifying bond categorized and clarifying assurities under the law and how administrative citations are handled and clarifies requirements for go
think like a battle ship city government is not easy to turn quickly. it's going to take us years of hard work and partnership and dedication to make that happen. i think we are forging those partnerships. i think there will be debated about centralize and decentralization but in the interim period or department heads make a determination about that i think it boils down to partnerships and i think department of technology and cio and coit we spend time creating these partnerships and the consolidation project is a great one. i also want to acknowledge the airport and the emergency management center and we have a great partnership with. we have a great partnership with labor and reclassify it positions and training program whereas in the past it was done on a department by department basis so i think we're creating those partnerships for success, but i think at the end of the day it's a transitional challenge for the organization to go from thinking of itself as minicorporations as they view themselves at times in independent departments to work together as a cohesive unit. it
, to have the city and also communicate to the state that we would like to see. another point to let you know is that there has been a rise in what we're calling "unofficial mobile recyclers." people who are not recycling centers, but we have them across the street over at grove and van ness in the evenings. so they collect -- they collect cans and the recycling goods from individuals and they take it to recycling centers. so i anticipate that -- because kevin and i had this discussion as we looked at mobile retail, you know, because it's been talked about should we do something about making sure that these entities operate as a business? but then, there is the complexity of are they a recycling center or not a recycling center? so the complexities around this issue about mobile need to be plushed out, but my concern is that we will see a continued rise in these individuals who are doing recycling -- purchasing crv redemption goods off the street and they could also possibly begin to show up more and more in the neighborhoods. especially if we do have a reduction in recycling cente
representing san francisco green party and the local organization our city. first a technical point on all of this. i was under the impression and check with dhr on this that the executive position still exists but filled on an interim basis. maybe i am wrong on that but good to make sure you're correct on that from the staff's perspective. i agree bringing it back in house because the next year is going to be really big for clean power sf and some other things and we need somebody that can be available five days a week, 50 weeks a year. i mean that's really going to be important, but the main thing i want to focus on is that the advocates for clean power sf have had some concerns with the way that lafco -- when we originally set set up lafco to work on clean power sf and especially get at the beginning of 2007 and what we needed from lafco and i believe the intention we needed somebody on task for clean power sf itself that could approach the sf puc on many occasions the sf puc wasn't thinking outside of the box on this to put it politely, and we need someone, and i think we will need
? >> is there any other cities that are doing the mobile recycling? >> no, just that one. >> san diego? >> yes, just san diego and i did speak with the folks in sacramento and there is legislation that will address bottle bill -- actually once a year or couple of years that they do a bottle bill fix and adjust things and there is another bill planned for this life-threateningive session in january. so i mean the timing is right in terms of if there were some recommendations coming out of san francisco, there is a vehicle for us to talk to the folks up there. >> great. >> this convenience zone, is that unique to california? >> it is. it's very unusual. i am from the east coast and grew up with the bottle bill there and it's very different. it's very successful here and they are talking about using it as a national model. there is an effort to try to create more jobs by creating more recycling infrastructure. because many states don't have anything at all and the stuff is just thrown out all over the place if you are driving across the country. they are looking at this particular law as a
francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of truste
church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play miami excited who will win that game. of the tens of thousands that watch those games those role models on the field are not ministers. those athletes have a role to play in diffusing this crisis in our culture. those that do music and art and attract by the thousands. we pay to hear them sing and watch them perform. they must lift their art above deck dance and inspire and something blowing in the wind and can't recycle our worse fears. our nation has become much too violent. we're the most violent nation on earth. we make of the most guns and we shoot them. we make the most bombs and we drop them. in this state unions larger than the teacher union and building first class jails and second class schools and [inaudible] stop the problem. each out and convene the family is the first step in the right direction. mr. mayor at this table must be disk jockeys, athlet
>> five, four, three, two, one! >> yay! across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you
at rolling stone magazine who grew up in the detroit area returns to the city to present a history and profile the influx of artists, environmentalists and city planners who are reemerging the urban landscape. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you all for coming. i have to say first i am honored that mark asked me to be part of this world trends from ann arbor where we went to college and we are both editors at the college newspaper. i knew then that mark was from the area like i am, but i didn't know his passion to write history and the stories here can that leads to my first question which is what led you to want to write this book? remember you calling me when you were starting to work on it and said i want to write a book about detroit and so do i. but this turned out to be a very different book than most of the others. >> i said that a little tiny bit when i went out to lunch the first time and you were one of the first people, thank you first of all for doing this but i guess i have always been drawn to detroit. i thought for the longest time that it would t
of breakfast with quite a host of wonderful, wonderful people who care about the city and about the world. and while the theme was articulated as a very rich greening theme, i think we found out from many, if not all of the speakers, that the way we care about our earth is reflected in the way we care for each other first and foremost. and that's really important. and, so, today i'm standing with people who have demonstrated their highest level of care for people, people who work and live and breathe the social safety net for everyone in our city. and i could not ever do my job as the mayor, nor i suggest any member of the board of supervisors, elected office who also have responsibility for caring about the quality of life for everyone, unless we had a caring leadership in our social safety net. so, thank you, everyone, for coming and being part of this season of giving and a season of caring and sharing with everyone. you know, this year our season of giving campaign i'm focused on highlighting organizations that really work on the ground with our domestic violence victims, our youth, o
and center is today was purchased by the city for $27,000. in the 1950s, the center was expanded by then mayor robinson and the old gym was built. thanks to the passage of the 2008 clean and safe neighborhood parks bond, the sunset playground has undergone extensive renovation to its four acres of fields, courts, play grounds, community rooms, and historic gymnasium. >> here we are. 60 years and $14 million later, and we have got this beautiful, brand-new rec center completely accessible to the entire neighborhood. >> the new rec center houses multi-purpose rooms for all kinds of activities, including basketball, line dancing, playing ping-pong, and arts and crafts. >> use it for whatever you want to do, you can do it here. >> on friday, november 16th, the dedication and ribbon cutting took place at the sunset playground and recreation center celebrating its renovation. it was raining, but the rain clearly did not dampen the spirits of the dignitaries, community members, and children in attendance. [cheering and applauding] ♪ ♪ >> well, good morning, good morning, everyone, a
will really enjoy. >> i am here with a manager at the heart of the city farmer's market in san francisco. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about the organization. >> we're 30 years old now. we started with 14 farmers, and it has grown out to over 80. >> what is the mission of the organization? >> this area has no grocery store spiller it is all mom-and- pop stores. we have this because it is needed. we knew it was needed. and the plaza needed somebody. it was empty. beautiful with city hall in the background. >> thank you for speaking with us. are you on the web? >> yes, hocfarmersmarket.org. >> check them out. thank you. >> welcome. the dish is ready. >> it looks and smells amazing. >> thank you. it was not easy to meet the $20 budget. i checked everybody out and found some great produce. really lovely seafood. i think that you are going to love it. >> do not be shy. cyou know this can run you $35 to $45 for a bowl, so it is great you did this for $20. >> this will feed four to six people. >> not if you invite me over for dinner. i am ready to dig in. >> i hope you'll love
was acquired for this hatched portion of the public right of way and transferred to the city as public right of way. therefore, we have found out that the building was now constructed approximately 3 feet over the prompt -- property line on the ground floor and 6 feet over the property line via the bay window. at that point we informed the applicant you have one of two choices, either go through a major encroachment process which we're doing now or alternatively go through a street vacation process so they can maintain the building fully inside their property line. we found out from planning that the vacation of public right of way is typically in contradiction to the general plan and therefore they requested us to go through this major encroachment process. the department in its evaluation does not believe this would necessarily be an appropriate permit for either the city or the applicant specifically. this permit will only grant a license to the property owner to maintain this and it would definitely place a cloud on the title, which may impact future sales and/or refinancing of that p
of wonderful, wonderful people who care about the city and about the world. and while the theme was articulated as a very rich greening theme, i think we found out from many, if not all of the speakers, that the way we care about our earth is reflected in the way we care for each other first and foremost. and that's really important. and, so, today i'm standing with people who have demonstrated their highest level of care for people, people who work and live and breathe the social safety net for everyone in our city. and i could not ever do my job as the mayor, nor i suggest any member of the board of supervisors, elected office who also have responsibility for caring about the quality of life for everyone, unless we had a caring leadership in our social safety net. so, thank you, everyone, for coming and being part of this season of giving and a season of caring and sharing with everyone. you know, this year our season of giving campaign i'm focused on highlighting organizations that really work on the ground with our domestic violence victims, our youth, our seniors, our veterans, and certain
. these are the folks that we are most thankful for because they give us purpose, and focus for this city and where we need to take it. that is why we build more parks and we invest in our open space. it is for all of these children and the families. i also want to thank all of the sponsors i know three of them are big sports sponsors in the city. and the reflected by the toy train that you see on the side. you will see the caboose, led by golden state warriors. followed by the 49ers. [ applause ] and then two-time world series champions, san francisco giants. [ applause ] >> they give us all of this inspiration and i know that we are looking at some of future players on these teams right here in front of us. so thank you everybody. if i may, during these happy times, when we are thankful for the things that we have and giving thanks for it, please remember the victims that continue to suffer on the east coast. and they are having a hard time it is very cold over there do anything that you can to help them. there are fellow citizens, they all wish that they could be here tonight. i am absolutely sure
to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the rive
depression. by over subsidizing food trucks, the city is attempting to can bolize the existing food establishments. that is not what free enterprise stands for. >> the principals of free enterprise that our nation is built upon do not allow blai tant emotion of one side of society at the cost of the other. it is designed to permit an individual to flourish in business with minimal government intervention. over here, the city is fully involved in pitching one side against the other. my question is, as a city of san francisco willing to breach the basic standards of free enterprise and fair play? >> the city has not conducted any economic survey to the state. to assess the impact that these are likely to have on existing businesses and we are talking about the people's livelihoods to be impacted. and in fact, the applicant, nor any city official can stand here and state that such a facility is not going to impact any existing business at all. and if so, why are we all standing here. please consider these matters, realistickly and i humblely ask this board to permanently revoke both of
. this is one of the greatest places in the city i am fond of saying. it's visionary. you heard about that from the mayor already and part of it is san francisco moving forward in a way that other cities just don't do. first and foremost other cities do not pass general obligation bonds of this type for a park and none for waterfront parks so we are already ahead of game that way, and we are proud of the generosity of the electoral for supporting that vision. secondly we don't have many parks and in san francisco there are a couple of open spaces but not in the middle much heavy industry use. this is a working port. work is going on as we speak but it's a place for habitat and a place for our own restoration so it makes it absolutely wonderful for that and you can get here by almost every mode. i would like to say you could take the train and the historic train and i encourage you to ride your bikes and bring your dog. this is the first dog sanctioned area and we're proud of that and i want to say thank you to all the people that made it happen and as mayor lee alluded to it's a
knew who to talk to and resolve the problem quickly. we were part of the city family's overall effort. that concludes my directors reports. julian parsons, this is my last directors report to you, it is an honor to be here with you for that. >> great. especially to hear that the giants celebration was so much more accessible than that of 2010. we discussed this in detail in committee. congratulations to those who made that happen for everybody. >> there's actually two things i forgot if i could add. we were proud to offer an mod wheelchair to willy mays here at city hall. for the event. and also, -- are councilmember roland -- was in the sitting area. i wanted to give an opportunity to see they had comments about that experience as well. >> yes. i did attend the celebration over at civic center plaza. also attended the 2010. by comparison, this year was remarkable. even the new access, getting the ambassadors, people to help, to get to the viewing platform was great. i also witnessed a person who actually needed emergency services. the did use that pathway that was created. it wor
will deal with that city by city and we will have success. secondly, the utility's charge various fees to set up and provide the electricity. we want to make sure that it is cost recovery and to not be unreasonable. we meet with them if their problem and we react. through the public utilities commission, through local regulation, we react and try to do everything we can to solve problems. if you are talking about deals like if you come to california, we will pay 7000 for any job, we have a little bit of that but it is hard to pay people for their business activities. we do not have enough money. they're doing that all over the state. cutting deals. we are doing that in some respects. it is our race. how does michigan spent so much subsidy attracting -- michigan is not doing that well. you have some money but what about other things to invest in and take care of? we want to make our regulatory climate more transparent. we have a long way to go. we are open and ready to go. there is a lot of people who want to keep the regulation complicated or make it worse. it is -- this could be somet
people find it disgusting. san francisco is about individual's rights and people come to the city to be who they are without concerns of bigging on tree and scorn. nudity is one more freedom that san francisco has championed. we took a step back with the towel law. let's not take another step backwards. i leave you with this quote from an rand. those that deny individual rights cannot be defenders for the majority. this legislation is using a sledge hammer to kill a flea. i urge you to vote no. thank you. >> thank you. next speaker. >> good morning. i am bruce dodea. as a child my father had a very racist sort of perspective on things. he felt that black people were bad people. i don't think that has a child i would have developed an exposure to thinking that black people were bad if not for my father. as an adult i have developed a broader opinion of things in which i think that i'm more open minded, so when i hear people discuss how disturbing this might be to a child i see it more of a perspective that the parent brings to that household opposed to some impression tha
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